The French Health Care System Part VII: Summary and Next Steps

I feel like now would be a great time to summarize my experiences so far under socialized medicine. Bear in mind my lens is one that compares my fortunately meager-though-life-long experience in the states with what I am going through now in France. Also bear in mind I live in the countryside; no doubt an experience in a larger city might not resemble my own documented throughout these posts. Generally speaking though:

  1. Everything costs less.
  2. Care is more congenial though not necessarily punctual or private (or cutting edge–that said, my generalist seems very open to research presented).
  3. Prescriptions and necessary tests are generously bestowed.
  4. Wait times for an appointment to see a specialist can be just as long here as anywhere.
  5. There is no centralized system of information, it seems, so one just carries her entire medical history around from one appointment to the next. That said, it would follow that it is up to me and me alone to make sure anyone I see knows all the facts.
Surgeon Wearing Scrubs And Mask
Surgeon Wearing Scrubs And Mask

The most annoying things about needing medical attention here are the same annoyances everywhere…the appointments, the driving around, the waiting. Here, there’s the language issue. But there, there’s the exclusionary and excessive costs. Here, there’s a certain laissez-faire attitude, but in the states, there’s that impersonal assembly line. So far, this leads me to put socialized medicine way ahead. Will that hold true?

The next step for me is an appointment with a GYN, which I was finally able to make with one in Bordeaux, in January. (Hey, not bad! Only a month away!) She speaks English, and though I was recommended to a couple of others closer to home, the language thing definitely influenced my choice. Medical stuff is stressful enough without a language barrier. Besides, having tried to make appointments with others and not being able to get through on the phone, I was happy to finally get a human on the other end of the line and just book.

I’m still in the midst of making my MRI (IRM here) appointment at the nearest hospital that offers it. I had a truly ridiculous Franglish conversation with the appointment person via phone, and we ended up moving the conversation to email which works better for me. I had to fill out a questionnaire saying I had no implants or metal parts, etc, etc., and now I’m simply waiting to here back. I’ve heard that MRI’s can take weeks to get here, but maybe not so much again in the country vs. city. We shall see. Fingers crossed it all goes smoothly and with plenty of time before my doctor’s appointment in January.

UPDATE: Finally arranged the MRI. It’s a good thing I followed up because the receptionist said she had emailed me my appointment a week ago; I never received it! She claimed it probably went to spam, which it did not, so I don’t know what happened. At any rate, I have an appointment in January (so four weeks away), and thankfully, the day before my specialist!

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